Category: Get Involved!

Studies at the CCRC


Healthy Volunteers Study 

At the Clinical Research Facility in Cambridge, we have a keen interest in metabolism, energy expenditure and energy balance, and have world leading scientists and state of the art metabolic measurement equipment. Many of the diseases we study require reference data from normal healthy people. 

To provide this we have two in-house studies that the general public can take part in. If you are interested in finding out about your / your child’s fat, muscle and bone mass and how it affects metabolism, and would like to take part in this study, please contact us. The study will involve us taking measurements during an overnight stay in the Clinical Research Facility, and you will be reimbursed for any travel costs.

For more information on this or how your child can participate, contact us by email or phone 01223 596077, or there is further information below about the Healthy Volunteers Study.

CRF 400 – For children aged 6 to 16 years

For children in this age group who would like to take part in this study, we have information for ages 6-10 years and 11-16 years as well as information for parents/ guardians

CRF 149 – For 17 years and over

If you are 17 years and over and would like to take part, click for more information here


VAMP Panel

The Volunteers Advancing Medicine Panel is a recallable panel of healthy volunteers aged 18-65 years who have agreed to provide fresh biological samples such as blood, urine and saliva for researchers associated with the Cambridge Biomedical Campus. The panel has been established to enable a quality-controlled supply of human biological samples to researchers undertaking basic science experiments. If you would like more information or would like to take part please contact us.


Find out about your body fat in our exercise study 

Inactivity, being overweight and genetic factors are the main risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, whereas life-long physical activity and training is one of the best strategies for reducing the risk. Exercise recommendations advise 30 minutes of daily moderate intensity exercise. 

However, many do not reach these recommendations and a common reason is lack of time. Recently, high intensity-low volume training (HI-LV) has been suggested as a time-saving alternative to more prolonged training to improve fitness and metabolic health.

Here at the Clinical Research Facility (CRF), we are looking for healthy men aged between 18-40 to help us investigate the health benefits of High Intensity Low Volume training (HI-LV).

We will ask you to visit the Clinical Research Facility three times for two nights and stay in our specially designed room for energy measurement.

During your stay we will learn about how much energy you burn in repeated sprint cycling and discover your body fat, muscle mass and bone density.

If you are interested or would like further information contact crf-volunteer@medschl.cam.ac.uk or call 01223 596077

Download our patient information sheet here


Findings from CCRC studies

Children’s Experience of Engaging in Research 

In 2013 children attending the CCRC for research studies were consulted about how to replace a broken games console. From the overwhelming response received, an idea came to give children a voice in research and create a Children’s Non-Executive Research Board.

This group gave children a chance to own the discussion about children’s research, develop new ideas and what facilities were needed to encourage more children to take part in research at the CCRC.

Introducing the CHEER project

Most researchers now have to commit to undertake Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) as part of their funding agreement; however, there has been little research where children and young people have been involved PPI projects.

Having created the Children’s Non-Executive Research Board, staff felt a secondary programme was needed to evaluate the Children’s Board – and from there the Children’s Experience of Engaging in Research (CHEER) project was conceived.

The study was a qualitative study (it sought the views and opinions of the children, young people, parents and staff who were involved with the Children’s Board). Five staff, two parents and two children agreed to participate in a face-to-face interview with a researcher to discuss their opinions and experiences of being involved research. From analysing these results, 12 key points have been made into summaries to help researchers undertake future PPI activities. Read the full paper here.


If you would like to find out more information on our current studies at the CRF or would like to take part in a clinical trial, please contact us via email or phone 01223 596077

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